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BFC Launches New Strategy to Kick Off LFW: Putting Community and Social Justice at the Forefront

by Emily Duff


The British Fashion Council (BFC) has unveiled an exciting new strategy aimed at empowering the fashion industry and fostering responsible growth, innovation, and social justice. 


The strategy, launched today (June 9th) to mark the beginning of London Fashion Week (LFW) June 2023. 


It marks a significant milestone in championing British fashion as a global creative force. With a diverse community of advocates, icons, experts, and fans, aiming to unlock and elevate British talent through world-class programs and initiatives.


The BFC's new strategy places the spotlight on British talent and seeks to amplify their voices on the world stage. By nurturing a remarkable spectrum of home-grown businesses and beloved brands, the BFC aims to make a lasting contribution not only to the economy but also to our national reputation in global culture.


From June 9th to 12th, LFW June 2023 promises an exciting lineup of fashion shows, presentations, panel discussions, and evening events. The schedule features thought-provoking discussions with industry leaders, highlighting crucial aspects of the fashion industry such as technology, craft, sustainability, and diversity.


As part of the BFC's commitment to education and development, this season's schedule showcases emerging talents from renowned institutions. Keep an eye out for shows from the University of Westminster BA, Ravensbourne University, and the University of East London. These shows provide a platform for the next generation of fashion designers to showcase their creativity and vision.


In addition to the industry-focused events, LFW June 2023 continues its tradition of inviting fashion enthusiasts to participate in the City Wide Celebration. Throughout the city, various activations await eager fashion fans, offering them a chance to engage with the fashion world firsthand.



One of the standout presentations to look forward to is from BFC NEWGEN's very own Saul Nash, scheduled for Monday, June 12th. Known for his innovative and boundary-pushing designs, Nash's showcase is expected to captivate audiences and leave a lasting impression. Additionally, BFC Member SMR Days will present their latest collection on Saturday, June 10th, offering a unique perspective on fashion and style.


With the launch of their new strategy during LFW June 2023, the British Fashion Council has set the stage for a vibrant and inclusive fashion industry. By placing the community at the forefront, emphasizing responsible growth, and amplifying the voices of British talent, the BFC is leading the way in promoting social justice within the fashion world. As the fashion shows, panel discussions, and city-wide celebrations unfold, it is clear that LFW June 2023 will be a groundbreaking event, showcasing the best of British fashion while championing the values of diversity, sustainability, and innovation. 

 

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