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Darling speaks to Isabelle, the powerhouse vocalist amassing millions of views

‘Change My Mind’ was the sixth single from the San Francisco and Portland-based, independent duo Moxxy Jones with notable singer-songwriter and vocalist Isabelle. The track - released by Starita Records, off of the duo’s debut synth-pop album, ‘Unnoticed’ (available in Dolby Atmos) - is modern rock with a twist, a clear departure from the more synth-pop releases of their past. 

The duo, composed of Milan (guitar) and Frank (keyboard), are known for their unique takes on traditional genres, a sound that’s full of dichotomy: unexpected yet familiar, energetic yet dark, sonically boundless with classical elements, and intentionally juxtaposed lyrics. 


Isabelle has made waves as a powerhouse vocalist through her appearances on American Idol, Off-Broadway Productions, and her viral, body positive single ‘Unlabeled’ (which has amassed nearly 5 million views). Her talent (and vocal style) transcends genre as well, making her the perfect collaborator for such a freeform project. We had an exclusive conversation with the musician which you can read below:

Thanks for chatting with Darling Magazine - can you tell us a bit about yourself and your background to our readers?

My name is Isabelle and I am singer/songwriter that loves to speak my mind through my music.


How would you describe your music to a new audience? 


I don’t like to be genre specific but I would say vulnerable, empowering and raw. I’m the girl you want to vent to and the friend who tells you that you can do anything and gets you out the door with one song.


What were your highs and lows during the recording process of “Change My Mind”?


More highs than lows working with Moxxy Jones on this song. The song was something out of my comfort zone. If you’ve heard it you would understand because there is such a contrast to the verses and choruses in mood and vibe. It was a lot of fun to go outside the box.

You have worked with Moxxy Jones in the past - what drew you back in for the second release?


Have you met these guys!? They are so great to collaborate with in a creative and personal sense. They also had so much trust from the beginning and welcomes my creative input. They are hilarious too which always helps. 


Why do you think it’s important to collaborate on projects with other musicians and producers?


Many minds or hearts are always better than one. Collaboration is how we share art and make it better together. As long as everyone involved is ego aside, it always makes for a great project.


How does this release differ from “Another Yesterday”?


AY had such a relaxed, summer vibe with a great nostalgic throwback feel. Change my mind is  a much darker song, dealing with emotions pertaining to loss and goodbyes. 

Do you have any future plans to release new music?

Absolutely! A new album for myself coming out August 2023. Check for updates at @isabellemusic on the gram! 


Edited by Emily Duff

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