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Barbie Fever Takes London at the Movie’s UK Premiere

by Joe Benham

Content created ahead of the SAG-AFTRA Strikes, we stand with the American actors' union and the Writers Guild of America who are fighting Hollywood labour disputes.


Last Wednesday (July 12th) saw the London premiere of Barbie - and it was yet another gloriously pink sight to behold.


The star-studded cast seized London for the premiere, with dedicated fans dressing up in their favourite Barbie inspired outfits. 


Some fans even attended as early as 3am to catch a glimpse of the real-life Barbie and Ken: Margot Robbie and Ryan Gosling. 


The pink carpet lined Leicester Square with quintessential Barbie motifs and logos plastered in every possible space.


But, the premiere wouldn’t feel the same without Barbie’s take on iconic British landmarks and culture. 


A giant ‘B’ bedazzled in a pink Union Jack flag stood in the centre of the carpet, whilst the London skyline on the promotional board was decked out in various tones of the colour. 


Even the legendary red telephone boxes, double decker buses and black cabs couldn’t escape the feverish makeover extravaganza. 


Warner Bros


If that wasn’t enough, stars of the film later lit up London landmarks including the London Eye and Trafalgar Square.


Now, as we’ve all been extremely aware, these premieres have always hit the mark when it comes to the fashion choices of the cast and this one was no exception either. 


Margot Robbie has been hitting us with classic Barbie references every single time and has always left us craving for more. 


Her looks have been inspired by various Barbie doll’s that have been released since the first doll hit the shelves in 1959. 


For example, for the LA premiere, she wore a custom Schiaparelli Haute Couture outfit inspired by the doll’s ‘Solo In The Spotlight’ look from 1960. It featured a dramatic tulle, off- the-shoulder sequin dress with a red rose, matching black opera gloves and a sheer pink handkerchief. She tied the look up with a Lorraine Schwartz diamond choker necklace, a bold red lip and a graceful updo.


For her London look, keeping with the British theme, Robbie decided to wear a Vivienne Westwood custom gown. With reference to the ‘Enchanted Evening’ Barbie which was released in 1960, the corseted gown consisted of a draped side train, made with a blush pink satin and embroidered white tulle, completing the ensemble with ivory opera gloves, pearl earrings, a rose brooch and a statement pearl choker.


Her counterpart, Ryan Gosling, who plays the endearing and loveable Ken, has been serving us pastel coloured suits. 


Alongside Robbie’s look at the premiere, he wore a head-to-toe Gucci outfit, opting for a pastel green suit paired with white loafers. 


Greta Gerwig, the director, wore a gorgeous pale pink sequin caped dress by Erdem. 


Their co-stars outfits were equally as outstanding and have given us plenty to awe about. Emma Mackey shone in a minimalist, white satin, spaghetti strapped gown paired with simplistic diamond jewellery, whilst Nicola Coughlan was literally dripping in jewels, she wore a bespoke TENCEL x Wiederhoeft outfit with Swarovski embroidered glass crystals.


Other prominent cast members that attended the event include Dua Lipa, Sam Smith, Connor Swindells, Issa Rae and Ncuti Gatwa. All of whom were in the same fashion echelon as their co- stars.


Barbie was produced by Margot Robbie and her production company, LuckyChap, alongside Gerwig’s artistic directorial vision. 


Speaking to ITV at the premiere, she said that it was really important for the film to showcase what the modern world looks like. “It’s extremely important” she said. “I don’t think that if Mattel had made this shift that they made in 2016 to be so inclusive of the Barbie line, I don’t know if this movie would have been possible. But they did and we could really take their lead in that respect. It’s wonderful.”


The premise of the film centres around Barbie suffering a crisis and questioning her world and existence. She is forced into exile and sets off on an adventure in the real world to discover that true perfection is found within.


Edited by Emily Duff

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