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Creative Ways to Infuse Bright Colours into Your Wardrobe

by Laaibah Amjad


When it comes to fashion, the power of colour cannot be overstated. Elevating your outfits with vibrant hues adds personality and flair, we’ve got some ingenious ways to incorporate colours into your wardrobe.



Colour Blocking 


Something more modern, master the art of colour blocking. Mix and match complementary or contrasting colours strategically to create visually striking combinations - think blue and yellow, or pink and purple.


Blazers 


Blazers are such a timeless and versatile piece and investing in a colourful blazer can instantly transform your look. Opt for bold shades like cobalt blue, emerald green, or fiery red  to make a statement. Pair your vibrant blazer with neutral tones for balance to ensure it becomes the focal point of your ensemble. 


Shoes


A key foundation for a good outfit that's often overlooked, Shoes are an easy way to add a pop of colour. Look no further than Daniela Uribe’s Italian-made footwear.


Their footwear collection boasts bold, contrasting colours and unique patterns, ensuring that every step you take becomes a statement of individuality and  style. Whether it’s vibrant red pumps, comfy trainers, or classic boots, it's easy to embrace a spectrum of colours in your looks through shoes.


Accessorise

 

Elevate your look with carefully chosen accessories that introduce bursts of colours that you can take off at any time. Scarves and hats are great choices in the winter, bonus points if both are matching. Statement jewellery also serves as a fab accent, allowing you to experiment with different hues without committing to a full colour palette. Trending at the moment, a pair of bold tights would be a great choice, inspired by Blair Waldorf. 


Patterns 


Introduce patterns for some playful personality. A little less serious, to make your wardrobe feel fun and you, consider anything from the wacky to the classic - like stripes or florals.



Monochromatic 


An indisputable timeless choice, stick to one colour all over. Select varying shades of the same colour to create a sophisticated and streamlined appearance. This technique excludes elegance, simplicity is key. 


Denim 


Harness the versatility of a denim shirt. Acting as a neutral canvas, a denim shirt complements various colours effortlessly. Experiment with layering to add texture and dimension to the overall look. 


Face Forward


Makeup is a great form of artistic expression, allowing you to experiment with colours, textures and styles. It’s like painting, with your face as the canvas. There’s so many ways to add a pop of colours into your makeup from lipstick to eyeshadow, eyeliner and even mascara. 


Remember, the key is to have fun with your style and use colours to express your personality. Whether you choose bold statements or subtle accents, embracing a diverse palette can breathe new life into your wardrobe.


Edited by Emily Duff

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